Lineage Society, Sources of Service

The Continental Navy: a timeline

Important Dates in the History of the Navy 26 Aug 1775: Creation of the Rhode Island State Navy. 5 Sep 1775: Commissioning of the Hanna, officially under the control of the Army. 13 Oct 1775: The Continental Congress authorized the outfitting of two ships, for "intercepting vessels coming out with stores and ammunition." This date… Continue reading The Continental Navy: a timeline

Lineage Society, Revolutionary War history, Sources of Service

Resources on the Continental Navy

Do you have ancestors who served in Continental Navy? These books can help you learn more about their experience: References: John Lehman, On Seas of Glory: Heroic Men, Great Ships, and Epic Battles of the American Navy (New York: The Free Press, 2001), 14, 32-33. Craig L. Symonds, The U.S. Navy: A Concise History (New… Continue reading Resources on the Continental Navy

Lineage Society, Revolutionary War history, Sources of Service

What is the Court of Appeal in Cases of Capture?

Privateers played a major role in American naval activities during the American Revolution. With permission from the government, privately owned ships could attempt to capture an enemy ship. If the capture was judged to be legal, the contents and ship would be sold - and the profits redistributed to the crew. At the start of… Continue reading What is the Court of Appeal in Cases of Capture?

Lineage Society, Revolutionary War history, Sources of Service

What was the Ladies’ Association of Philadelphia?

Founded in 1780 by Esther de Berdt Reed, the Ladies' Association of Philadelphia raised money for the Continental Army through door to door fundraising. The organization raised over $7,000, which was used to clothe soldiers. Although heavily critiqued, the Association was one of the first American examples of organized political action by women. The family's… Continue reading What was the Ladies’ Association of Philadelphia?

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Can I use my Revolutionary War ancestor’s military headstone as “proof” of their service?

The white marble military headstone is a powerful symbol of service and sacrifice. However, it doesn't date to the period of the American Revolution. The marble headstone came into being in 1873, as a way to mark the graves of the dead of the Civil War. As noted by the National Cemetery Administration, it was… Continue reading Can I use my Revolutionary War ancestor’s military headstone as “proof” of their service?

Sources of Service

My ancestor supposedly loaned money to the Continental government. How do I find evidence?

An ancestor who loaned money to the Continental government during the American Revolution would be considered to have "patriotic service" by the Sons of the American Revolution or the Daughters of the American Revolution. The Daughters of the American Revolution has begun digitizing records of the loans made from Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire.… Continue reading My ancestor supposedly loaned money to the Continental government. How do I find evidence?

Lineage Society, Sources of Service

How do I document a new Revolutionary War ancestor?

If you're interested in joining a Revolutionary War lineage society, it's recommended that you use an ancestor already on file. However, with the exception of the Society of the Cincinnati, the recommendation is not a requirement. Most Revolutionary War lineage societies allow you to add new ancestors - provided that the ancestor meets their requirements.… Continue reading How do I document a new Revolutionary War ancestor?

Lineage Society, Sources of Service

A digital collection covering Connecticut in the American Revolution

Thanks to the Connecticut Historical Society, a collection of Revolutionary War era manuscripts are now available for viewing on the Connecticut Digital Archive. This diverse collection includes images of several orderly books, hospital records, correspondence, muster and pay rolls, and more. Of particular interest is a document attesting that Backus Fox, a man held in… Continue reading A digital collection covering Connecticut in the American Revolution

Lineage Society, Sources of Service

Why is it so challenging to document a female patriot?

Women supported the American cause during the Revolutionary War. Yet, most of the available records address men. Why - and how does it impact our research? In a word: coverture. Wikipedia's explanation of the legal principal is quite clear (and detailed, for those interested in the history). As the listing indicates, coverture is "a legal… Continue reading Why is it so challenging to document a female patriot?