Lineage Society

Did Connecticut issue bounty land for Revolutionary War service?

Enjoy a final great question from our inaugural “Tracing Connecticut Revolutionary War ‘patriots'” program.

First of all, what’s bounty land? This finding aid from NARA offers a great brief description. In short, bounty land was a right to “public” land (owned by the state or federal government). It was issued to Revolutionary War veterans as a reward for their service. Some states offered bounty land for soldiers that had supported their cause.

Connecticut was not one of them, although you’ll still sometimes hear claims that Connecticut offered bounty land. What Connecticut offered was land in exchange for damages. This land located in Ohio, called the Firelands or the Suffers’ Lands, was supposed to recompense families who had their property burned by the British. The majority of the claims were not occupied by the original claimants. See the above cited resource at the CT State Library or this profile at Ohio History Central for more details.

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Did Connecticut pay state Revolutionary War pensions?

Another great question from our Revolutionary War program!

While some states – most notably Virginia – paid state level pensions to increase participation in the American Revolution, Connecticut did not. If your ancestor were to receive a pension for his military service from Connecticut during the American Revolution, it was paid by the federal government. The majority of these pensions have been digitized and are accessible with a subscription from Fold3.

Happy hunting!

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Did Connecticut pay supply taxes during the American Revolution? And did paying them qualify my ancestor for DAR or SAR?

Thanks to all who attended our Revolutionary War program this past Wednesday. We received some great follow up questions after the program and wanted to share the answers here.

While some colonies (now states) had taxes that were gathered specifically in support of the War, Connecticut did not. Instead, towns gathered taxes for the running of government as they always had. In some cases, they allocated a specific portion for the support of the Army. You can find out when and where this occurred by reading the town meeting records of the town where your ancestor resided.

The question of DAR/SAR qualifications is a complicated one. When these taxes were paid, it wasn’t stated that the money would be going to the Army. It was allocated afterwards. Therefore, it’s less clear whether someone with loyalist leanings would have objected to paying them. We’re still waiting for a ruling from DAR or SAR on this matter. If you do decide to submit taxes as service from Connecticut, be sure to find a secondary source.

How do you document that your ancestor paid these taxes? You’ll need to access and copy two sets of documents. First, you’ll need to access the section of the town meeting records that indicates the allocation of this money. In most cases, the town meeting records are held at either the State Library or the office of the local town clerk. If you can’t locate them, the State Library should be able to help. Second, you’ll need to access the grand list, the document that indicates your ancestor paid taxes that year. Many have not survived, but those that have are generally in the office of the town clerk.

Best of luck! And if you do submit this, please let us know how it goes.

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Researching Revolutionary Service in France

The American Revolution wasn’t just fought in the boundaries of the modern United States. It was truly fought around the world. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution recognize that fact by allowing membership based on ancestor’s support of the American cause, no matter where they were located. That includes France.

How did France support the American cause? The country did so politically, militarily, and economically. A treaty was signed between France and the new United States in 1778. A 1936 article indicates 2112 French soldiers died in the support of the American cause. As the US State Department notes, France also kept the Continental Army supplied between 1778 and the end of the War. Ancestors who offered support through any of these efforts would qualify for the Revolutionary War lineage societies.

Where do you begin finding evidence? The Daughters of the American Revolution and the French Society of the Cincinnati both keep extensive records. So to do the publications contained in the National Library of France. It’s worth beginning with this one: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5525402h.texteImage.

Happy hunting!

Lineage Society

Researching African American patriots

African American “patriots” – the term used by the Sons of the American Revolution and Daughters of the American Revolution to describe individuals who supported the American cause during the American Revolution – are underrepresented among the verified DAR and SAR ancestors.

Why?

  1. Many African American patriots served as Continental line soldiers, as opposed to militia soldiers. This changes where their records were stored. Militias were handled locally; the Continental line records are stored federally. This difference in storage means that someone researching a region rather than a specific name is likely to miss a Continental line soldier.
  2. At least locally in New England, many African American patriots – particularly soldiers – ended up in unmarked graves, due to a combination of systemic racism, poverty, and disability resulting from their long military service. If you’re looking for a gravestone indicating military service, you may not find one. That means the soldier is less likely to be recognized as a patriot.
  3. These lineage societies have had a history of racism, most notably DAR’s 1939 refusal to allow Marian Anderson to use their performance space. They are working hard to address their pasts and fully recognize the service of all patriots. DAR, for example, just announced an initiative to support further research. But, change is unfortunately slow, and much more work is needed to fully recognize the commitment of these men and women.

So, what can be done to change that?

  1. Some of the changes have to be made by the lineage societies themselves. They need to make themselves visible to all communities, just not the ones they’ve traditionally reached. Some chapters are making an effort to do that. However, if you see a need, feel to free reach out. You may be educating a chapter or helping them accomplish a goal that they’ve had and not known how to fulfill.
  2. If you know your ancestry, think about membership. Are you descended from one of these men or women? If so, please think about joining. You’ll be promoting change in a positive way. Even if you’re not interested in membership, please share your ancestor’s story. DAR and SAR both have ways of publicly recognizing the service of patriots separate from membership.
  3. If you don’t know your ancestry, don’t give up! There are active projects working to trace the descendants of patriots, including patriots of color. If you know your family was from a specific region, be sure to connect with the local DAR or SAR organization. They may be able to help.

We’ve only touched the tip of a very complex topic. If you have questions about the application process or DAR/SAR recognition of African American patriots, please contact us. We’ll be glad to share resources, and we’d love to do more posts!

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Common DAR and SAR questions: Does the ancestor need to have my last name?

This questions come up enough to surprise me: do your Daughters of the American Revolution and Sons of the American Revolution ancestors need to share your last name?

There’s a simple answer: no. While choosing a qualifying ancestor with your last name is a great way to honor your heritage, you can choose any ancestor in your family tree who meets the qualification requirements for DAR and SAR. And they do not need to be a direct female line or male line ancestor.

Have fun hunting!

Contact us with questions.

Lineage Society

Common DAR + SAR questions: Do all your ancestors need to be married?

Yes, lineage societies have historically required that your ancestors be legitimate – that their parents must be married – and some lineage societies still do.

That being said, the Sons of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the American Revolution are not among them. They require “proof” that the child is the child of the parents, not that the child is the product of the married parents.

If you’re confused, don’t worry. Here’s what you need to know:

  1. If the child’s parents were married, expect to be asked for documentation of marriage. In some older lines, it might be the only way to document the child’s mother, as birth records often only included the father’s name.
  2. If the child’s parents were not married, that should not be an issue, provided that the birth certificate lists the names of the parents. Expect to be asked to provide a note explaining the circumstances, just so the genealogist knows not to look for a marriage record.

Want to learn more about DAR or SAR applications? Read more on our blog.

Have a question we haven’t answered? Contact us.

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Common DAR + SAR application questions: why hire a professional genealogist?

Do professional genealogists work on applications for the Sons of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the American Revolution? Is there value to hiring a professional genealogist when I can do the work myself?

Yes.

And it depends on your goals.

You can definitely do the work yourself (and it’s a great option if you can and want to) but it’s fairly common to get stuck part way through the process. There’s a relationship you can’t document or a vital record you can’t figure out how to obtain. While the society may be able to help, a professional genealogist may have knowledge or resources the society may not. More than once, we’ve been able to get around brick walls or find a missing document that a local volunteer just couldn’t reach.

And there are occasions where you just can’t do the work yourself. A small child (or grandchild) at home, an ill family member, a busy job are all very valid reasons for not having time to complete an application. DAR and SAR aren’t set up to order almost every single certificate for you and do all the research. We are.

Want to learn more? Check out our lineage society applications page or contact us with questions.

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Common DAR + SAR questions: Will the Sons of the American Revolution help with my application?

Starting a new application can feel a little scary. Both DAR and SAR have built in programs to help, but they look a little different.

You can safely ask for help on your Sons of the American Revolution application from two people:

  1. Your point of contact: This may be the state registrar, the local registrar or someone else. Be aware of two things. First, they may not be able to help. Explain what you’re looking for, and ask if they can assist or if they can refer you to someone who can. Second, if they can help, you need to have realistic expectations. Their job is not to gather all the needed paperwork for your application. They’re simply there to offer advice.
  2. A genealogy assistant: SAR genealogy assistants are able to assist with research in a limited way. Again, they’re not there to do the application for you. But they can help with a hard to prove link or tell you where to look.

In short, yes, SAR will help with your application. Just remember that their job is not to do your application. If you’re not hiring professional help (see our future post), it’s yours. They’re just there to assist!

Have questions? Want to hire help? Contact us.

Lineage Society

Common DAR + SAR application questions: Grandma’s or Grandpa’s papers

Are you working on your Daughters of the American Revolution or Sons of the American Revolution application? Since Grandma or Grandpa was a member, it’s going to be easy, right?

Maybe.

The answer to the question of “can you use a family member’s papers to join DAR or SAR?” is always yes. But the answer of “to what extent” is going to vary.

Why? Because the standards used by the society have changed since Grandma or Grandpa submitted. They’ve changed in the last two or three years. If the original application doesn’t meet modern standards, you’ll only be able to use it as a hint.

How do you know? Ask for help. You won’t be able to tell on your own. We’d be glad to take a look. Your registrar should also be able to tell.

Questions? Want help. Contact us.